Ontario Launches Review Of Accessibility Legislation

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Ontario Launches Review Of Accessibility Legislation

McGuinty Government Helping People With Disabilities

Ontario has appointed Charles Beer to conduct a mandatory independent review of the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act.

Under the act, Ontario is making the province accessible for people with disabilities by 2025 through standards, which will break down barriers in key areas of every day life. Beer will evaluate how these accessibility standards are being developed. Through this review, Ontario can make sure accessibility takes place in a way that makes sense for people with disabilities, businesses and organizations.

Ontarians will have the opportunity to participate in this review and provide feedback about the act. Beer will also consult with people from the disability, business and public sector communities. He is expected to submit his report in January 2010.

Quick Facts

  • 1.85 million Ontarians have a disability and this number will grow as the baby boomer generation ages.
  • More than 200 people participated on committees that drafted the accessibility standards.
  • Accessibility standards are being phased-in to give businesses and organizations time to break down barriers for people with disabilities over planning cycles.

Quotes

Madeleine Meilleur

“Our accessibility legislation is built on a foundation of collaboration and flexibility. We have made a lot of progress over the past four years and we continue to work with our partners to make sure we're on the right track for 2025.”

Madeleine Meilleur

Minister of Community and Social Services

“I am honoured to have the opportunity to play a role in reviewing Ontario's accessibility legislation. I look forward to consulting with a variety of people across the province to gauge, and ultimately strengthen, the effectiveness of the legislation.”

Charles Beer

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