Innovative partnership takes 2003 Ontario Aboriginal Partnerships Recognition Award

Archived Release

Innovative partnership takes 2003 Ontario Aboriginal Partnerships Recognition Award

Ministry of Indigenous Affairs

TORONTO, Jan. 15 - David Zimmer, Parliamentary Assistant to The Honourable Michael J. Bryant, Attorney General and Minister Responsible for Native Affairs, today announced that the partnership between Pine Tree Native Centre of Brant and the Corporation of the City of Brantford has won the fourth annual Ontario Aboriginal Partnerships Recognition Award. "Ontario is proud to recognize economic development partnerships that mean a brighter future for Aboriginal people throughout the province," said Zimmer. "The McGuinty government is committed to a new spirit of co-operation and optimism, and the recipients of this Award are a shining example of this for all of Ontario." The Ontario Aboriginal Partnerships Recognition Award was established in co-operation with the National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation. The Award celebrates a successful Ontario-based business partnership between an Aboriginal business, community, or organization and either a non-Aboriginal or Aboriginal business, community or organization. "The Pine Tree Native Centre and the City of Brantford's partnership is a prime example of how joint ventures between an organization and a municipality can encourage economic development and growth for Aboriginal communities. I am pleased to see this kind of economic initiative, as it is providing real jobs and revenue generation for the community," said John Kim Bell, Founder and President, National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation. "Recognizing successful business partnerships through this awards program is an effective means for encouraging further joint ventures and lets the public know the Aboriginal community is open for business." The partnership between the Pine Tree Native Centre of Brant and the City of Brantford developed and constructed a tourist destination called Kanata. A Wampum belt depicting a longhouse binds the agreement between the two parties. Kanata is a replica of a 17th century Iroquois village, and includes features such as a longhouse, medicine trail, lacrosse field, cafeteria, and gift shop. Located on King Street in Brantford, Kanata is a profitable venture employing four full-time, and six part-time staff as well as summer students, co-op placements and community service positions. Revenues generated from the village contribute to the social and health programs at the Pine Tree Native Centre of Brant. The City of Brantford helped with the development of Kanata by leasing 16 acres of city land, free of charge, to the project. Brantford and its area businesses have benefited by linking marketing strategies and promotions with Kanata. There are also increased opportunities for area hotels and hospitality providers. Visitors come from all parts of the world. "Kanata is an excellent example of how the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal community can work together to build a better future and break down historical barriers by developing innovative partnerships," said Zimmer as he presented the Award. "We want to recognize the positive contributions made by partnerships, such as the one we are celebrating today." Disponible en fran├žais For more information visit www.aboriginalbusiness.on.ca, www.nativeaffairs.jus.gov.on.caFor further information: Greg Crone, Minister's Office, (416) 326-1785; Merike Nurming, Communications Branch, Ontario Native Affairs Secretariat, (416) 326-4079; Judy Tobe, National Aboriginal Achievement Foundation, (416) 926-0775, 1-800-329-9780; Trudy Jones, Pine Tree Native Centre of Brant, (519) 752-5132; Josee Mannen, City of Brantford, (519)-759-4150