Ontario Senior Achievement Award Recipients Announced For 2005

Archived Release

Ontario Senior Achievement Award Recipients Announced For 2005

Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration

22 Recipients Honoured For Making Important Contributions To Their Communities TORONTO, March 7 - An 84-year-old marathon runner is among the twenty-two recipients of the Ontario Senior Achievement Awards for 2005 announced today by Jim Bradley, Minister Responsible for Seniors. The awards will be presented at Queen's Park by the Hon. James K. Bartleman, Lieutenant Governor of Ontario. The ceremony will take place on Wednesday, March 8th at 10:00 a.m. on the Grand Staircase of the Legislative Building. "From the marathon runner who took up running in his 60s, to a bestselling author who published 13 books after she turned 65, the 2005 recipients give new meaning to the terms zest for life and healthy aging," said Bradley. The Ontario Senior Achievement Awards are presented annually to recognize and honour outstanding seniors who have made significant contributions to their communities. Their voluntary or professional achievement can take place in any field or endeavour. The recipients of the 2005 Seniors Award are: Tom Atkins of King City - As the founding president of Oak Ridges Moraine Land Trust, Mr. Atkins turned a volunteer grassroots environmental group into one of Canada's leading environmental organizations. Hugh Boggs of Kingsville - With an outstanding 34-year-history of providing volunteer service to his community, at age 90 Mr. Boggs is known as "Mr. Service to Others" and was given the highest award possible by Branch 188 of The Royal Canadian Legion of Kingsville. Shirley Broostad of Acton - Ms. Broostad exemplifies the helpful spirit of small town living through her advocacy on behalf of seniors. She actively participates in the Halton Hills Injury Prevention Committee, the Isolated Seniors Committee, the Acton Seniors Centre and the local All Star Reading school program. Marjorie Colbourne of Alliston - Ms. Colbourne is a lifeline for housebound seniors. She single-handedly operates a shut-in service on behalf of the New Tecumseth Public Library, delivering books and helping individuals maintain a positive link with their community. Dr. Donald Curtis of Peterborough - Dr. Curtis put Peterborough on the map as the home of a museum of national importance. Through his efforts, he helped establish the Canadian Canoe Museum and preserved, for future generations, an important part of our history. Melba England of London - For the past sixteen years, Ms. England has served as a choir master at McCormick Home, a residence for seniors. At age 90, Ms. England is an inspiration lifting spirits and turning anxiety into comfort and praise. Margaret Ferguson of St. Catharines - Ms. Ferguson has spent a lifetime volunteering her time on behalf of the Children's Discovery Centre of Niagara, the St. Catharines Museum, and the St. Catharines Hospital Auxiliary. In 2004, Ms. Ferguson and her husband Bob were presented with the T. Roy Adams Humanitarian Award. Gwynneth Foster of Barry's Bay - Ms. Foster created the innovative "Wheels to Meals" program and helped bring lonely and isolated seniors together for a luncheon on the first Wednesday of each month. Ms. Foster's leadership is recognized in the Renfrew-Nipissing-Pembroke area for the volunteer service she provides at the Opeongo Seniors Centre and the programs she initiated in support of literacy among seniors. She is a recipient of the Frances Lever Memorial Award by the Ontario Literacy Coalition. Mendel Good of Toronto - A survivor of Nazi labour and death camps, Mr. Good has dedicated himself to preserving the history and memory of the Holocaust. For more than 30 years, he has spoken to thousands of individuals, mostly students, of the need to protect human rights wherever they are threatened. Lois Gun-Munro of Toronto - An outstanding volunteer for ten years at the west-end Toronto office of the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB), Ms. Gun-Munro personally understands the challenges that a visually-impaired person faces. It is her own triumph over adversity that allows her to run two support groups and inspire others in similar situations. Boyd Hipfner of Toronto - Mr. Hipfner is responsible for the Designated Waiting Areas we now see on subway platforms. His contributions have made an enormous impact upon the lives of the blind, visually impaired, and deaf blind people in Toronto and across Canada. He is also an active member of the Toronto Transit Commission's Advisory Board for Accessible Transportation. Shirley Martin of Grimsby - Ms. Martin is a former Member of Parliament who served Grimsby, Lincoln and the Niagara Peninsula. Her contribution to education, culture, health and economic development have been invaluable to the growth and prosperity of her community and Niagara Region. Edwin Matthews of Peterborough - Epitomizing the Rotary Club's golden rule - Service Above Self - Mr. Matthews is a well-known artist who has devoted his time and art to establish one of the finest art galleries in Canada and assist many local charities to raise funds. Lloyd Morgan of Windsor - For the past 25 years, Lloyd has been the driving force behind the Rotary Club in Windsor region. He has been a tireless promoter of the ethics stressed by Rotary Clubs in secondary and elementary school boards in Windsor and Essex County. Prue Morton of Thunder Bay (posthumous) - Ms. Morton was a champion of seniors and an advocate for patients. As a valuable resource regarding community social services, Ms. Morton made significant contributions to the quality of life for citizens living in Thunder Bay. Wei-Ling Qiu of Toronto - As vice-president of the Chinese Medicine and Acupuncture Association of Canada, Professor Qui has played a significant role in having Oriental healing practices accepted and regulated in Ontario. She has also contributed as a volunteer to the social and economic needs of the Chinese community. Odino Soligo of Thornhill - He broke more records and is the current world record holder for the 50k and 100k runs in his age group. Mr. Soligo is an 84-year-old marathon runner who sees his mission as motivating people of all ages to play an active role in helping others. Edna Staebler of Waterloo - Even though she only started writing at an age when most people consider retirement, Ms. Staebler has authored over 20 books including Canada's bestselling hardcover cookbook Food That Really Schmecks. Few people have motivated so many to write, shared their craft with others and promoted Canadian pride through literature. Ms. Staebler is a member of the Order of Canada. Ernie Weeks of Hamilton - At the youthful age of 94, Mr. Weeks is a hometown hero. He served his country as an airman in the Second World War, operated a successful hardware store for 32 years, and volunteers his time to those in need. As an active member of the Rotary Club, his energy and positive outlook on life make him an outstanding role model and champion. Frank Welsh of Tillsonburg - Named Citizen of the Year in 2002 by Tillsonburg District Chamber of Commerce, Mr. Welsh is a founding board member of the Tillsonburg & District Multi-Service Centre. Dr. Robert Williams of Bolton - This retired veterinarian is providing outstanding leadership to the Caledon community. Through his leadership, the community built Rotary Place, a 6,000 square foot civic club for seniors. Gordon Wright of Beeton - As an active and long-serving volunteer and fundraiser for Junior Diabetes and Diabetes charities, Mr. Wright founded the Banting Memorial High School Run/Walk for Diabetes, which raised almost $40,000 in 2002. Mr. Gordon was awarded the Queen's Jubilee Medal for community service in 2003. Disponible en francais www.gov.on.ca/citizenship/seniorsFor further information: Contacts: David Oved, Minister's Office, (416) 314-1400; Donna Piasentini, Communications Branch, (416) 314-7242