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Ontario Is A Leader In Protecting Drinking Water

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Ontario Is A Leader In Protecting Drinking Water

McGuinty Government Releases Annual Drinking Water Report

Ontario's drinking water is among the best protected in the world. 

The Minister's Annual Report on Drinking Water 2009 shows how the government, in partnership with individuals and organizations, is protecting the province's drinking water. It focuses on key achievements and activities from July 2008 to June 2009, including:

  • The approval of the province's first municipal drinking water system licences  
  • The release of the Lake Simcoe Protection Plan, the first of its kind in Ontario to address environmental protection of a watershed
  • The release of the first Water Quality in Ontario 2008 Report on the progress the province has made in restoring and protecting water resources
  • The passage of the Toxics Reduction Act that requires industry to prepare plans to reduce their use of toxic substances
  • The progress made by the local committees charged with preparing plans to protect local drinking water sources.
The report also provides highlights of the performance of municipal drinking water systems from April 2007 to March 2008.  Details were released earlier this year by Ontario's Chief Drinking Water Inspector.

Quick Facts

  • The Chief Drinking Water Inspector noted in his annual report that 99.85 per cent of drinking water quality tests from municipal residential drinking water systems met Ontario's strict drinking water quality standards.

Background Information

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Quotes

“Ontario is a leader in protecting drinking water. We have tough standards in place and continue to move ahead with aggressive measures to protect our drinking water. I am proud of the actions we have taken and the progress we have made.”

John Gerretsen

Minister of the Environment

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