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Ontario bioauto council projects

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Ontario bioauto council projects

The Ontario BioAuto Council was launched in 2006 and has received more than $6 million in funding from the province. The council brings together the agriculture and forestry sectors, chemical and plastic producers and advanced manufacturing. The council's investment fund helps companies develop and commercialize their bio-based materials, and supports the $3 billion Ontario Innovation Agenda.

These materials will position Ontario to meet the enormous growing demand for alternative, sustainable, bio-based products in the automotive, construction, furniture and consumer goods sectors. The global renewable and bioproducts industry is expected to exceed $125 billion in revenues by the year 2010.

PROJECTS FUNDED BY THE ONTARIO BIOAUTO COUNCIL

Canadian General-Tower Limited (Cambridge) - Hard PVC plastic is made soft and flexible for use in upholstery and other automotive products through the use of plasticizers. The most common plasticizers are phthalates, which are petroleum-based. In this project, CGT, a North American leader in the production of automotive interior trim materials, will evaluate two bio-based plasticizers. If successful, the company could convert up to 90 per cent of its products to use bio-based plasticizers by 2012. Through the Ontario BioAuto Council, the province is contributing $776,250 to this project.

GreenCore Composites (Toronto) - GreenCore is a spin-off company created by the Innovations Group at the University of Toronto in September 2005 to commercialize natural-fibre composites technology. While natural-fibre composites already exist, GreenCore is developing a next generation product that delivers better strength and performance at a lighter weight. The company's Green Inside™ pellets could be used in several sectors, including automotive, furniture and other consumer products. Trials with automotive industry partners have confirmed the commercial potential of GreenCore's technology. Through the Ontario BioAuto Council, the province is committing $755,000 to help the company refine its production process, improve the product, and support the adoption of the material by industrial customers.

The Woodbridge Group (Mississauga) - The Woodbridge Group's BioFoam technology is derived from plant seed oils instead of petroleum. Today, it's used in the seat cushions, head restraints and arm rests of several popular vehicles. Now Woodbridge is developing new applications for the material. One of these is a system that incorporates BioFoam with natural fibres to create automotive ceilings that are lighter and provide better cabin sound quality. Through the Ontario BioAuto Council, the province is committing $1 million to this project.

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