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Wolf Lake To Remain Forest Reserve

Archived News Release

Wolf Lake To Remain Forest Reserve

McGuinty Government Ensures Sustainable Development, Protects Old Growth Forest

Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry

Ontario is protecting the environment and giving clarity to developers by ensuring the Wolf Lake Old Growth Forest, north of Sudbury, remains a protected area.

Retaining Wolf Lake's Forest Reserve status prohibits the commercial harvesting of old growth red pine while still allowing for exploration and development of existing mining claims and leases.

An Environmental Registry posting was made in June 2011 to consult on the future use of the Wolf Lake Forest Reserve. The decision to maintain Forest Reserve status is based on the feedback received through the posting.

Pursuing a balanced approach to development is part of the McGuinty government's plan to protect the environment and support sustainable jobs for Ontario families for generations to come.

Quick Facts

  • Most industrial activities, such as forestry, are prohibited under the Forest Reserve designation, with the exception of mineral exploration and development on existing mining claims and leases.
  • Of the original 4,099 hectares Wolf Lake Forest Reserve, approximately 40 per cent was added to Chiniguichi Waterway Provincial Park after existing mining rights expired.
  • Wolf Lake is a part of the Sudbury district and is not a part of the Temagami Land Use Planning Area.

Quotes

Michael Gravelle

“We are taking a balanced approach to support the economic development of the North while protecting environmental treasures like the Wolf Lake Forest Reserve. We have provided significant support to Ontario's mining industry and we will continue to do so in the future.”

Michael Gravelle

Minister of Natural Resource

Media Contacts

  • Media calls only: Maya Gorham

    Minister's Office

    416-314-2198

  • Media calls only: Media Desk

    Communications Services Branch

    416-314-2106

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