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Ontario Creates First Local Forest Management Corporation

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Ontario Creates First Local Forest Management Corporation

McGuinty Government Growing Forestry Sector, Creating Jobs

Ontario has established the province's first Local Forest Management Corporation, the Nawiinginokiima Forest Management Corporation, to re-energize the forestry sector, create jobs and boost the economy.

This government agency will manage and oversee the sale of timber along the northeast shore of Lake Superior. The plan calls for the corporation to manage five existing forest management units — Nagagami Forest, White River Forest, Big Pic Forest, Black River Forest and the Pic River Ojibway Forest.

With this new model, local timber supply will be better aligned with market demand. It will also be easier for entrepreneurs, First Nations and local communities to participate in the forestry industry and will help the forestry sector grow and create jobs.

Modernizing the management of wood supply is part of the McGuinty government's Growth Plan for Northern Ontario. A strong northern economy protects the services that mean most to Ontario families — health care and education.

Quick Facts

  • The Nawiinginokiima Forest Management Corporation will be operational by spring 2013 and will comprise an area roughly the size of Lake Ontario.
  • Nawiinginokiima is an Ojibway word that means "working together."
  • Since 2005, the Ontario government has invested almost $1 billion to support the forestry sector.

Additional Resources

Quotes

“We are working closely with local communities, First Nations and industry to modernize the system that governs who manages Crown forests, how companies get wood and how it is priced. The establishment of this new forest management model is a major step that will help make Ontario's forest industry more competitive, attract new investment and create jobs.”

Michael Gravelle

Minister of Natural Resources

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Business and Economy Rural and North