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Moose Survey Results by Region

Archived Backgrounder

Moose Survey Results by Region

Moose populations are showing signs of decline in most areas of northeastern Ontario and in the more accessible parts of northwestern Ontario.

The Ministry of Natural Resources conducts moose aerial inventory surveys each year to track trends in the population. Moose population trends are also assessed through hunter surveys each fall.

Specifically, this winter's surveys showed the following changes:

  • Northwest: Aerial surveys were flown in 14 of the 30 wildlife management units. Moose populations are estimated to be stable in five, stable-to-decreasing in three, and decreasing in five. Notable decreases were seen in wildlife management units 5 and 8 in Dryden District, 14 in Nipigon District, 13 in Thunder Bay District and 9B and 11A in Fort Frances District. See the associated chart for more details.
  • Northeast: Aerial surveys were flown in seven of the 27 wildlife management units. Moose populations are estimated to be stable in one and decreasing in six. Decreases were seen in wildlife management units 23 in Hearst District, 28 in Kirkland Lake District, 32 in Wawa District, 35 and 36 in Sault Ste. Marie District and 41 in North Bay District, whereas the population is stable for 39 in Sudbury District. See the associated chart for more details.
  • Southern: Aerial surveys were flown in four of the 15 wildlife management units. Moose populations are estimated to be stable to increasing in all wildlife management units surveyed. See the associated chart for more details.

Factors such as harvest, predation, parasites, habitat condition and low calf numbers can all contribute to shifts in moose population. There have also been concerns about the health of moose populations in areas close to Ontario, such as Minnesota and Manitoba. Ontario will continue to monitor the moose population and collaborate with the hunting community to ensure moose populations are sustainable.

Ontario is working to determine how to best respond to emerging pressures on moose through the Moose Project, which is looking at how many moose Ontario's habitat can sustain and possible changes to how and when they can be hunted, such as adjusting hunting season lengths. The province plans to seek public input on these new approaches this summer.

For more information about the moose tags available in your area, refer to the 2014 Hunting Summary Regulations at ontario.ca/hunting.

Media Contacts

  • Brad Allison

    Regional Wildlife Biologist (Northwest)

    807-475-1596

  • Peter Davis

    Regional Wildlife Biologist (Northeast)

    705-235-1180

  • Mike Gatt

    Regional Wildlife Biologist (South)

    705-755-3285

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