Ontario Newsroom

Students mine new skills at Confederation College

Archived News Release

Students mine new skills at Confederation College

McGuinty Government Invests In Mining, Construction Training

Office of the Premier

Ontario is helping Confederation College expand so more students in northern Ontario can get the skills they need to get good jobs.

The province is investing $9.5 million to upgrade the college's equipment and provide new classroom space. The college will also introduce new and expanded programs so students can train for new careers as welders, miners and construction workers. This expansion means the college can welcome nearly 300 more students and will create more than 100 jobs.

Many high-growth industries -- including information technology, construction, energy and mining -- face a shortage of people with the right skills. The government's three-year, $1.5-billion Skills to Jobs Action Plan is aimed at closing that gap by training workers in the skills employers seek.

Quick Facts

  • Confederation College's main campus is in Thunder Bay. Secondary campuses are in Dryden, Fort Frances, Geraldton, Kenora, Marathon and Sioux Lookout.
  • More than 4,000 full-time students attend Confederation College.
  • Confederation College's first regional campus classes were held in a converted school bus.

Additional Resources

Quotes

“There are thousands of high-skill jobs employers can't fill and a lot of people working in skilled trades are going to retire soon. So investing in Confederation College will help our people prepare for the new economy.”

Dalton McGuinty

Premier of Ontario

“There's a mining boom going on right now in the north. More skilled workers will help us fill jobs now and in the future.”

Michael Gravelle

MPP, Thunder Bay-Superior North

“Confederation College has been educating northwestern Ontarians for 40 years. This funding will prepare more of our people for great careers.”

Bill Mauro

MPP, Thunder Bay-Atikokan

Share

Tags

Education and Training Jobs and Employment Rural and North Children and Youth