Biography : Eleanor McMahon

Eleanor McMahon

Eleanor McMahon

Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport

MPP Burlington

Political Career

  • Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry, June 2014 – June 2016

Education

  • Certificate in Business Administration, Economics, Marketing, University of Ottawa
  • Honours BA, French Language and Literature, University of Windsor

Personal and Family Life

  • Husband Greg Stobbart, OPP Sergeant, was killed in a cycling collision in 2006

Memberships and Associations

  • Share the Road Cycling Coalition (founder)

Executive Biography

Eleanor McMahon was first elected to the Ontario legislature in 2014 as the MPP for Burlington.

McMahon currently serves as Minister of Tourism, Culture and Sport. She was previously Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Natural Resources and Forestry.

She has spent her career in senior roles in business, government and the not-for-profit sector. McMahon held a number of roles on Parliament Hill early in her career, including as Press Secretary to Jean Chrétien. She has served as Director of Public Affairs at the Canadian Advisory Council on the Status of Women, as well as Vice President at the Canadian Chamber of Commerce. McMahon has also been Director of Public Affairs at Petro-Canada, Vice President at United Way Ottawa and Executive Director of Public Affairs at the Ontario Medical Association.

In 2006, her husband, OPP Sergeant Greg Stobbart, was killed in a cycling collision with a driver with five convictions for driving under suspension. That led McMahon to launch a campaign to improve road safety and enhance legislation in Ontario. In 2008, she launched the Share the Road Cycling Coalition, a provincial cycling policy and advocacy organization created to unite cycling organizations from across Ontario and work with municipalities to make their communities more bicycle-friendly.

McMahon lobbied successfully for enhanced penalties for suspended drivers in Ontario. This led to the passage of Greg’s Law in 2009 to reduce the number of suspended drivers and repeat offenders on Ontario’s roads.

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